Pure Butchery or a Winter’s Tale

In winter I do my food growing in the barn, with nothing growing in the garden and only pruning in the orchard. I’m making bacon, salami and prosciutto (Italian style ham) with parts of our homekilled pigs. Though not this year as we had no pigs. After a hectic start we soon had bacon brining in a barrel and hams dry-curing in the spare fridge. Home-cured bacon is a simple and fun way to make or grow more of what you eat. Our chef son adds coffee to the cure, which is basically sugar and spice.

Prosciutto is another matter. Several weeks salting, then each ham takes months to age and air-dry. The meat is hung in a cool dry airy place (the barn). Examined for unwelcome mould (anything that isn’t white and powdery) any appearing is wiped off with vinegar-soaked cloths. Like the guru at River Cottage I rub them with acidophilous powder (the probiotic in yogurt) before they’re hung. This creates a slightly acid environment, helping proper ageing. At Christmas we discover if this care has produced the expensive delight we anticipate.

Salami gives quicker results. Four weeks after stuffing the skins, the beer sticks are already delicious. Full size ones take a little longer. They are less simple than hams though, soon after we hung them suspicious moulds appeared. Vinegar removed them for a while, but they returned. Then we spotted that Hugh F-W doesn’t cover salami. He is less afraid of flies and infection, but we realised that winter temperatures (keeping our garden from growing) also keep flies away. Uncovered they dried faster with no bad moulds. We’ve tried the “plain” beersticks, delicious, next the various flavours of pure pork ones…

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