Storing Pumpkins (and other produce)

When talking about storing produce. We face several enemies, and they need different tactics:

Temperature: too hot and ripening will turn to rot, yet if we live high enough frost can also be a problem. A garage or shed, that does not get too much sun on a hot day is good. My granddad used his roofspace, but in the Bay that probably gets too hot even in winter. Remember airflow is needed, so don’t use unventilated plastic.

Fungi and mildew: damp brings these on, so keep things dry, but keeping the produce from touching helps slow the spread. Traditionally straw was used to separate and keep dry, though some swear by newspaper.

Possums, rats and mice: These pests love pumpkin, and absolutely adore apples. Yet, since still air encourages rot, keeping them out may conflict with the need for airflow. So hanging a sack from rafters is good, and mesh or netting cages also stop pests but allow air.

One of our group suggested washing pumpkins in water with a little Janola (1.5tsp/bucket) to kill spores that may cause problems (the stalk of pumpkins is especially vulnerable to such attacks).

Asking around more widely about storing potatoes, somebody suggested a variant of the British “clamp” or earth covered pile, ideal for lazy gardeners like me. Leave the potatoes in the ground till you need them, but cover the soil with straw and tarpaulin or old roofing sheets. The straw keeps the soil cool, the tarpaulin or whatever keeps it dry, and until they are cooked potatoes are indigestible to four-legged pests. As a bonus the ground will be in perfect shape for some manure and a spring planting.

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